Saturday, August 15, 2020

What They Said Saturday: "... the royal family forgetting themselves in their anxiety for those around them."

'What They Said' Saturday: a day for quotations of all kinds, including excerpts from letters written by Marie Antoinette and her contemporaries, memoirs, non-fiction, novels and everything in between.

 
 image: The Royal Family in the Temple, reproduced on a postcard
 
When the royal family was originally moved to the Temple, the Great Tower--where it was decreed the family would be held--was not yet prepared for residence, as it had been neglected in recent years. It was decided that the family would be temporarily kept in the little Tower, using furniture taken from the Tuileries, until the Great Tower could be properly furnished; and more importantly, until it could be properly fortified so that it could be kept isolated and guarded from the outside. 
 
In her memoirs, the duchesse de Tourzel recalls the early days of the family's captivity; the duchesse, along with her daughter and the Princesse de Lamballe, would later be arrested and taken away from the Temple. In the meantime, however, she recalls how the royal family enjoyed an uneasy yet intimate family life.

As the Queen's room was the largest, we occupied it during the day, the king also coming down to it early in the morning. ... a Commissioner of the Commune, who was changed every hour, was always in the room where they were. The royal family conversed to kindly with all of them that they succeeded in making an impression on several.

At meal-times we went down to a room underneath that of the Queen, which we used as a dining room, and at five o'clock in the evening their Majesties took a walk in the garden, for they dared not let Mgr. the Dauphin go out alone, for fear of giving the Commissioners the idea of taking possession of him. On this subject they several times heard very sinister remarks which they pretended they did not hear, and the promenade lasted sufficiently long for the two children to get the fresh air so necessary for them, the royal family forgetting themselves in their anxiety for those around them.

Friday, August 7, 2020

JSTOR Expanded Access: Royal "Matronage" of Women Artists in the Late-18th Century by Heidi A. Strobel

 JSTOR announced earlier this month that they will be provided expanded access through 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This expanded access includes free read-online access for 100 articles per month through December 31st, 2020.

Note: You will need to log in to a JSTOR account to access this article. Accounts are free, so sign up and enjoy!

Royal "Matronage" of Women Artists in the Late-18th Century by Heidi A. Strobel

An examination of the popular tendency for female nobility to support the patronage of women artists during the latter half of the 18th century.

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Review: Poesie Perfumes 'In the Steps of Marie Antoinette' Collection

Review: Poesie Perfumes 'In the Steps of Marie Antoinette' Collection 



I love perfume, and over the past year I've dived headfirst into the world of indie fragrances. Poesie  has become one of my favorite indie perfume houses due to their diverse range of scents which range from

In 2019, Poesie released a special limited collection titled "In the Steps of Marie Antoinette," featuring 6 scents inspired by the queen of France. At the time the collection was released, I didn't have enough spending money to try them all--but thanks to Poesie's annual "Reissue Event," a limited-time event where you can order retired items from their catalog, I was finally able to collect all of them.


À la Reine

Scent Notes: fresh ripe tomato, cucumber, a bouquet of garden herbs, sweet soil, all damp from the summer rain

My Thoughts:

This scent is so, so green. I love that the emphasis is on the vegetable garden, rather than florals--not that there's anything wrong with florals, but I feel like most 'hameau de la reine' inspired scents I've tried before are heavy on the florals. This scent  makes me feel like I'm walking through a vegetable garden after the rain--moist garden dirt, spicy herbs, but then a vegetable sweetness from the juicy tomatoes and cucumbers. It's really amazing how this scent captures the very particular way that gardens smell after the rain... a sort of slightly sweet, slightly spicy earth tinged with vegetables and grass. 

Petit Trianon

Scent Notes: a freshly picked bouquet of wood violets, accented with jasmine sambac, tuberose and Madonna lily, sheer sandalwood

My Thoughts:

This is another scent that I picked up when the collection was originally released. I can't resist a Trianon inspired scent!  This is a very white floral scent, with hints of green underneath, but it is mostly the violets, jasmine and tuberose that stand out. The sandalwood provides a solid thread for the florals and overall the scent gives the impression of walking through a carefully cultivated garden. A very warm, floral scent. 

Rococo Paradise

Scent Notes: ripe strawberries, plush apricot, fresh grass, milk + honey, lavender sprigs

My Thoughts:

This is one of the scents I picked up last year, and it's one of my favorite scents in my collection. This scent smells it belongs in the scene from Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette where the queen and her entourage are picking strawberries and drinking fresh milk at the hameau de la reine. The milk provides a soft creaminess to the scent, which is complemented by the fresh grass and lavender. The strawberries add sweetness--it's more of a wild strawberry undertone, berries tinged with green. A naturally sweet and mellow scent overall.

Folly of Love

Scent Notes: Paradise apples, purple lilac blooms, white Bourbon roses, seductive vanilla

My Thoughts:

I didn't receive this scent until the 2020 reissue event, and truthfully I wish I had picked up a larger size! It is a very soft, summery fragrance. The lilacs and roses form nice floral base, while the apples bright the fragrance with a touch of sweet fruitiness. The vanilla takes awhile to come out, but when it does it adds a rounded softness to the delicate fragrance. I was originally a bit worried that the florals would be overbearing, but the apple note keeps things bright and youthful.

Infamous

Scent Notes: luscious white cake layered with sticky marshmallow creme and topped with mounds of vanilla frosting

My Thoughts:

Unfortunately, this is the only scent from the collection that I did not enjoy. The reason for this is that there is barely any scent at all on my skin. It has an extremely light throw, and I genuinely have to stick my nose right up to my skin to smell anything. Even then, all I can get is a very, very faint vanilla. This is pretty unusual for this company, as while I haven't always enjoyed every scent I've gotten from Poesie, none of them have been so non-existent in terms of scent. Maybe it was an off batch!

Versailles

Scent Notes: golden cake, intoxicating orange blossom, fluffy vanilla citrus icing, blood orange

My Thoughts:

I feel like “Versailles” is what I anticipated from Infamous.  It's not an extremely strong scent, but it has a light to medium throw comparable to other “cake” scents I’ve gotten from Poesie.  This one smells like a vanilla cake smothered in delicious, luscious vanilla-orange frosting. Rich and creamy and downright yummy.

Where to Get Them

"In the Steps of Marie Antoinette" was a limited collection, so the full collection is no longer available from Poesie. However, "Versailles" was added to the Poesie General Catalog based on its popularity so it is available for ordering on the shop page here. The scent does seem to sell out fairly regularly, but it is restocked regularly as well.

If you use Reddit, I would recommend checking out the Sunday IMAM Indie Marketplace thread, where you can sometimes find people selling or swapping discontinued scents. The Indie Marketplace thread is posted every Sunday.

Or you can put a pin in this and wait until 2021 when Poesie will likely do another Reissue event.


Wednesday, July 15, 2020

JSTOR Expanded Access: The French Revolution on Film: American and French Perspectives by Casey Harison

JSTOR announced earlier this month that they will be provided expanded access through 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This expanded access includes free read-online access for 100 articles per month through December 31st, 2020.

Note: You will need to log in to a JSTOR account to access this article. Accounts are free, so sign up and enjoy!

 image: a screenshot from La Marseillaise (1938)


An examination of the popular and contextual differences of how the French Revolution is depicted in American versus French cinema.

Friday, July 10, 2020

JSTOR Expanded Access: To Be(head) a Family: British Poetry and the Reclamation of Marie Antoinette by Trey Conatser

JSTOR announced earlier this month that they will be provided expanded access through 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This expanded access includes free read-online access for 100 articles per month through December 31st, 2020.

Note: You will need to log in to a JSTOR account to access this article. Accounts are free, so sign up and enjoy!

Detail from Marie Antoinette Being Taken to her Execution by William Hamilton, 1794.

To Be(head) a Family: British Poetry and the Reclamation of Marie Antoinette by Trey Conatser

 An examination of early British poetry, circa 1791 through around 1796, which symbolized the downfall, death and British legacy of Marie Antoinette.

Monday, June 29, 2020

Music Monday: Sonata No. 2 in A Major by the Chevalier de Saint-Georges

Music Monday: a day for contemporary music, soundtracks and other tunes related to Marie Antoinette.



Joseph Bologne, or the chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745-1799) was an classical composer and champion fencer; he was the son of a plantation owner and a slave, Anne, known as "Nanon." His father took Joseph to France when he was a child in order to receive an education, then later brought Joseph's mother to France and set the pair up in an apartment so that Joseph could continue his studies in France. Despite the racist laws limiting the freedoms of non-white people living in France, the chevalier de Saint-Georges became beloved in various high circles for his champion fencing skills, musical compositions, and his charming wit, intelligence and personality.

He became acquainted with Marie Antoinette, who advocated for him when the position of director to the Paris Opera needed to be filled. Unfortunately, racism overcame his potential appointment: several actresses and others working for the Paris Opera signed a petition addressing the queen, saying that they would not accept orders from "a mulatto." The petition was publicly published and the chevalier de Saint-Georges withdrew his bid for director, noting that he did not want to cause the queen any scandal. Marie Antoinette continued to invite him to her private salon, where they would play together along with a small group of her favorites.

The chevalier de Saint-Georges composed several operas along with symphonic work and other pieces intended for private performance. Only one of his operas has survived in full, although a few vocal pieces survived from his other operas due to their popularity. 

The above is a performance of his Sonata no.2 in A major. II. Andantino - Allegro Minore, as performed by Quinton Morris on the violin and Li-Tan Hsu on the piano.

Friday, June 26, 2020

JSTOR Expanded Access: Human Nature and a cyclical view of History in Chantal Thomas' "Les adieux à la reine" by Claire Marrone

JSTOR announced earlier this month that they will be provided expanded access through 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This expanded access includes free read-online access for 100 articles per month through December 31st, 2020.

As I search and bookmark and note what I'd like to read, I've decided to share some Marie Antoinette and adjacent finds that are well worth signing up for a free JSTOR account to access! These will be shared at least once a week under the post series 'JSTOR Expanded Access.'
Note: You will need to log in to a JSTOR account to access this article. Accounts are free, so sign up and enjoy!

[image: a screenshot from the film adaptation of Les adieux à la reine]
Human Nature and a cyclical view of History in Chantal Thomas' "Les adieux à la reine" by Claire Marrone 

An analysis of the way that Chantal Thomas utilizes the style and narrative scope of her novel Les adieux à la reine, told from the point-of-view of a former reader of Marie Antoinette now living in exile in Vienna, to represent specific traits of human nature.